A quick review: Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is an embodiment of relentless fortitude in times of distress, religious demeanour protecting her from the ills of a depraved society and of mental illumination which help observe the silent yet minutest life. Her plainness is trifled by her possession of a rare generosity in always providing from her little means to anyone she finds in need. Charlotte Bronte has made us see beyond the materialism of our world and how void is the life thriving off monetary accumulation without virtue of soul. Jane’s relationship with Mr. Rochester is indicative of how love could only survive, regardless of fortune or corporeal beauty, by the supply of constant flow of deep and plain affection from the heart.

Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
A lovely tale of female heroism fighting singlehandedly for what it believes is right in the light of moral guidance. No wonder this tale after decades on, still hails as one of the best, for its endless dictation of morality and self-sacrifice which I feel is greatly needed in our society today as ever before.

A short review originally posted on Goodreads. Detailed review to be posted here soon. 

Flower Adorned Headbands

Gifts. Who doesn’t like gifts that are more personalized and meticulously handcrafted? – this is where crochet comes in handy! After a long search for ideas to make perfect gifts for my friend’s little daughters, I came across some wonderful floral headbands. Now, headbands have been in vogue for times immemorial and thankfully, they are here to stay. They have great versatility for style, colours and textures and can be adorned by women of all ages. So, with all arguments commending, I set out to make my addition to this ever evolving accessory. Continue reading “Flower Adorned Headbands”

Reminiscing: A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities: a story of profound pathos and raw reality combined. Written by Charles Dickens in 1859, it relates to drastically changing events around social and economic landscape in Europe, France in particular, leading up to the pinnacle of French Revolution. The story starts early in 1775 when turbulent times were just brewing as described by his famous quote ” It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity….”

I remember when my mother bought me a copy of Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, she said it to be an exquisite tale of true heroism and dark history. I was in grade 8 then ( if my memory serves me right) and reading classics seemed as bland as attending an interminable class of history. So, no thank you, it didn’t appeal to me at all, and that feeling was reinforced after skimming through the first few pages where the language struck me as enigmatic as some ancient Egyptian hieroglyph.Yet, thankfully over the years I’ve realized the importance of classical texts; their irreplaceable strength in shaping, even thousand years on, our society today.

A Tale of Two Cities
A Tale of Two Cities – My weather-worn edition.

A Tale of Two Cities: a story of profound pathos and raw reality combined. Written by Charles Dickens in 1859, it relates to drastically changing events around social and economic landscape in Europe, France in particular, leading up to the pinnacle of French Revolution. The story starts early in 1775 when turbulent times were just brewing as described by his famous quote ” It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity….”There  was marked disconcert among people due to prevalent atrocities – subjugation by aristocracy including clergy, and the blatant lawlessness which hung as doom mainly over the lower echelons of society. It was in that period Dr. Alexandre Manette, a French Physician, became incarcerated, after a spate of ill fate experienced at the hands of an oligarch Marquis de st Evermonde. The misery endured over 18 years in captivation didn’t end at his salvage by his daughter Lucie Mannette, aided by another faithful companion Mr. Jarvis Lorry, but rather extended to a more rueful journey in the aftermath. Continue reading “Reminiscing: A Tale of Two Cities”

Gray-scale Mandala

For my first blog, I thought I should do about a craft I have just recently begun and yet, becoming more drawn to it progressively: Crochet.

Gray-scale Mandala
Gray-scale Mandala – Top view
This is my own version of mandala crocheted after being inspired by a similar mandala done by Gabriela.  The colour combinations highlight the monochromatic tone which is very aesthetically pleasing. Following the same idea, my version has focused on the gray-scale hue – the choice of colours was based on the theme of the room where I intended to place it.

Gray-scale Mandala
Gray-scale Mandala – Close up
I’ve used medium-weight yarn of shades silver-grey, black, white and dark-grey. I’ve used two different hook sizes : 4.0 mm and 4.5 mm. 4.0 for the first six rounds and then continued with 4.5 till the last round. It measures about 12 inches in diameter approximately – large enough for a  small coffee-table runner. It can also be used as wall hanging for an ornate decor.

Gray-scale Mandala
Gray-scale Mandala – A nice vintage look!
To make your own here is the link to the pattern – Made in K-town: Little Spring Mandala. An elaborate tutorial full of pictures easy to follow even for beginners.Feel free to post your own versions below in the comment section. Also, follow me on Pinterest for more inspirations for crocheters. Thank you and hope you liked my first blog!